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Archive for January, 2010

Unhappy hipster modernism

January 31, 2010 Leave a comment

You can come out when you can properly explain the differences between modernist architecture & postmodern ornamentation http://ow.ly/12jDD

Categories: modernism

EMiC RAships and Internships

January 26, 2010 Leave a comment

Please note that the March 1, 2010 deadline for RAs and interns is approaching. This source of funding is available to EMiC project co-applicants only. (According to SSHRC regulations, collaborators are ineligible for these funds.) Students cannot apply directly to EMiC for RAships or internships; these funds are distributed to project co-applicants who, in turn, will hire RAs using these resources. If you are a student looking to work as an EMiC RA, talk to one of the project co-applicants to see how and if you can get involved. A list of co-applicants is available on the project website: http://editingmodernism.ca/co-app.html

Given EMiC’s focus on editing, first priority in assigning RAs is given to the support of editorial projects. Co-applicants can request interns either to provide support for presses, electronic text centres and summer institutes working in partnership with EMiC or to facilitate the organization and hosting of workshops and conferences.

Given the number of editions EMiC has undertaken to publish, and the scope of related activities, editors should expect to be assigned no more than one RA per print or electronic edition and no more than one intern per event or activity. Co-applicants are encouraged to seek matching funds from their universities and from granting agencies.

The relation of the RA to the editor, and of the intern to co-applicant and EMiC partner, should be mutually beneficial: in return for valuable assistance, co-applicants and partners should provide the RA or intern with training and mentoring in as wide a range of work as the editorial project, event or activity itself permits. 

EMiC will provide an allocation of $5000 to successful RA and intern applicants. Applicants themselves will be responsible for determining both the number of hours/week and the term of the research assistantship within the guidelines established by their universities.

While EMiC is unable to commit to any additional funding for RAs or interns beyond the $5,000 allocation per edition or event, applications for funding above and beyond this amount may be considered by the committee on a case by case basis and awarded (when funds are available) to those co-applicants who can demonstrate that the scale of their particular projects and/or other institutional considerations warrant additional funding.

Once the RA or intern has completed his or her work on the project, both co-applicant and RA or intern are required to submit separate reports online at the EMiC website. Subsequent applications will be conditional on the timely submission of these reports.

If you have any questions, please contact us at emic@dal.ca. Paul Hjartarson of the University of Alberta is the current chair of the committee responsible for the allocation of RAs and interns, and he can be reached by email at Paul.Hjartarson@ualberta.ca.

Please submit your application using the online form at the project website. These guidelines are available online as well.

Categories: editions, EMiC, modernism

EMiC Postdoctoral Fellowship

January 22, 2010 Leave a comment

The Editing Modernism in Canada (EMiC) project, funded by a Strategic Knowledge Cluster grant (2008-15) from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, invites applications to its 2010 competition for a postdoctoral fellowship. Our current EMiC postdoctoral fellow, Meagan Timney, is working under the supervision of Ray Siemens at the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab at the University of Victoria, and in collaboration with Martin Holmes at UVic’s Humanities Computing and Media Centre, on the development of the Image Markup Tool and publication engine for the production of the project’s digital editions and archives.

EMiC offers two-year postdoctoral fellowships valued at $31,500 per year to PhD students in the final year of their program and recent graduates who are engaged in research relevant to the project’s mandate: to produce critically edited texts by modernist Canadian authors. The awards are tenable at any of the EMiC partner universities and are supervised by, or undertaken in collaboration with, co-applicants or collaborators.

Although preference will be given to research projects most directly relevant to the task of producing critically edited texts by modernist Canadian authors, these awards are open to recently graduated postdoctoral scholars engaged in research projects relevant to one or more of the three components of this project: literary modernism, scholarly editing, and the digital humanities.

Applicants must not hold a tenure or tenure-track position or other full-time employment. Fellows are expected to engage in full-time postdoctoral research during the term of the award.

Preference will be given to recent graduates, that is, to graduates applying within five years of receiving their doctoral degree.

The awards are not renewable beyond the second year.

EMiC will provide an allocation of $31,500 per year to the partner universities at which successful applicants propose to engage in their research. EMiC co-applicants or collaborators will be responsible for ensuring that those funds are administered in keeping with the guidelines established by their respective universities. In a sponsorship letter the postdoctoral supervisor should clearly indicate the university’s willingness to host the EMiC postdoctoral fellow and the arrangements made regarding office space, library access, supplies and teaching that will be made available.

Applications must be submitted via the online form available at the project website: http://editingmodernism.ca/postdoc_funding.html

Application deadline: 1 March 2010

Categories: editions, EMiC, modernism

EMiC MA and PhD Stipends

January 22, 2010 1 comment

The Editing Modernism in Canada project, funded by a Strategic Knowledge Cluster grant (2008-15) from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, invites applications to its 2010 competition for master’s and doctoral stipends. Current EMiC graduate fellows are working on projects such as the print editions and digital archive in the Collected Works of P.K. Page, critical editions of works by Marius Barbeau, Martha Ostenso, F.R. Scott, Hugh MacLennan, Ernest Buckler and Miriam Waddington, and the collaboratively written play Eight Men Speak.

EMiC offers one-year stipends of $12,000 (MA) or $15,000 (PhD) to graduate students who are registered in, or entering, an MA or PhD program at one of the EMiC partner universities and who are engaged in research relevant to the project’s mandate: to produce critically edited texts by modernist Canadian authors. Successful applicants are strongly encouraged to seek matching funds from their universities and external funding from granting agencies.

In offering these stipends, EMiC interprets its mandate in the broadest possible terms: that is, the stipends are not limited to masters and doctoral students involved in work on an EMiC print or electronic edition; on the contrary, they are open to any student engaged in masters or doctoral research relevant to one or more of the three components of this project: literary modernism, scholarly editing, and the digital humanities. While EMiC interprets its mandate in the broadest possible terms, preference will be given to research projects most directly relevant to the task of producing critically edited texts by modernist Canadian authors.

Although the stipends are for a single year, doctoral students can reapply for a second award. Such re-applications by doctoral students are not automatic renewals; requests for renewals will be adjudicated in the same manner as, and in competition with, new applications. EMiC will neither entertain applications for a third doctoral stipend nor award funding to students beyond the fifth year of their program.

EMiC will provide an allocation of $12,000 (MA) or $15,000 (PhD) to the partner universities at which successful applicants are registered. EMiC co-applicants and collaborators will be responsible for ensuring that those funds are administered in keeping with the guidelines established by their respective universities.

MA and PhD students must be supervised by an EMiC co-applicant or collaborator and enrolled at or applying to an EMiC partner institution. Before submitting an application for funding, incoming students must secure commitments in principle from prospective supervisors and students already enrolled in a graduate program at an EMiC partner institution must obtain a supervisor. EMiC cannot fund students supervised by faculty members who are not themselves project participants.

Applications should be submitted via the online form available the project website: http://editingmodernism.ca/ma_phd_funding.html

Application deadline: 1 March 2010

Categories: editions, EMiC, modernism

Magazine Modernism, NEH Summer Seminar

January 19, 2010 Leave a comment

Magazine Modernism, NEH Summer Seminar for College and University Teachers
12 July – 6 August 2010 http://ow.ly/Ydlo

A clipped page

January 18, 2010 1 comment

Now your least thought is the poor type on cheap newsprint.

—P.K. Page, ‘Elegy’

Every morning since PK’s passing late last week I open newspapers, websites, and blogs in search of obituaries. Clipped and bookmarked, tweeted and posted, I’m awash in commemoration. Poets publish swift elegies, journalists gather quick soundbites. For days I have nothing much to say. Others remember her for me. I take a seat at the back of of the mourning crowd, let the words snag at my ears, bite at my eyes.

Last summer I visited PK at her home in Victoria. She opened her living room to a small band of scholars who are in the process of editing her collected works, professors and students awed and hanging on her every syllable, grazing on books in her library and paintings on the walls. She asked us to help bring out a cache of stragglers she’d recently uncovered, which we unwrapped and held in our hands, passed around in a circle of whispered devotions. A colleague evaluated and dated the pieces as they passed by, speaking with intimate knowledge of thin layers of gouache, bright surfaces fluid with biomorphism of Brazil and Mexico.

Victoria’s my home town, and for me it’s synonymous with PK. Ever since I listened to her read a handful of poems to a summer seminar I was taking during my undergrad at UVic in the early 90s, I’ve been a devotée. That July afternoon she converted a cult of young poets to serve as her disciples. I left the room dizzy from the kaleidoscope she twisted before our eyes, ears belled with tintinnabulations, and dashed off to town to buy a book of her poetry. At Munro’s I found The Glass Air, and at the used book stores I combed shelves for her early volumes, bought the ones I could afford and coveted the rare and signed collector’s items. What I really wanted that summer was a copy of the glosas she’d just read to us—a new form she was testing out in a manuscript that a few years later became Hologram: A Book of Glosas. The rest of July and August I tried to write a glosa. Joined by friends, we plucked an opening quatrain from our favourite poets, our cabeza, and assembled four ten-line stanzas that borrow one by one from each of those four lines. Some of us observed the glosa‘s rhyme scheme (lines 6, 9, 10); most of us reared on modernism considered that an archaic option. After Hologram appeared in 1994, poets across the country papered the walls with glosas.

That same summer introduced me to the poetry of Anne Wilkinson, a poet whom PK had met in the early 1950s. When PK came to read at UVic I asked her about Wilkinson, and she offered to lend me a recording of an interview she’d done for the CBC. The interview with PK was taped over another recording, so the sound of her voice was cracked through with what I imagined at the time to be the ethereal tunings of glass air. From that recording, from Wilkinson’s poetry and journals, and from the description of the character Anne in Michael Ondaatje’s In the Skin of a Lion, I pieced together my first and only glosa:

Druidsong

But I am two times born
And when a new moon cuts the night
Or full moons froth with my
And witches’ milk

—Anne Wilkinson, from the notebooks

I walk the tightrope, she said—
skin taut, opaque as parchment,
almost bewitching, P.K. said.
Walking walking wooden fibres,
no broom to sweep her fear,
ink-soaked in paper grains,
beaten by Wind, Winter, the Fall
into this pulp. I stir her mash
of ashes, bind her skin to mine,
But I am two times born,

said she, I walk the tightrope,
unwound from womb to stone.
I untie her umbilical knot,
plunge my head in placenta—
let skin and stone leaves
envein me red and green,
let tongue and eye rhyme
enchant me—O Mother Rime,
I bewitch an unborn line,
And when a new moon cuts the night

it carves your circle in stone;
and I, a Jack-in-the-Green,
do sing in Nemi Wood, dance
in your leaves, peel motes
scaled green by bladed moon.
Come, Ophelia, twisting rosemary,
come, Ariel, knotted in pine,
come, hearken to my song, I sing
of Anne’s eye in mine, sing,
Or full moons froth with my

wood blown blood.  I conjure
with Circe, Kalypso, in caves
chorded with mother tongues.
As archangels, we unravel wings,
stretch a tightrope from moon
to woman, weave our ancient
amble, trip on crimson tongues
of after-birth, double-birth,
of another Mother, tasting blood
And witches’ milk.

PK’s decision to accept an invitation from Doug Beardsley to read her poems to a group of students taking his class at UVic transformed me and my Victoria forever. It didn’t turn me into much of a poet, but it offered a new destination for literary pilgrimages: the used books stores of Victoria—Hawthorne’s, Renaissance, Wells—to which I returned in a ritual act, where I collected textual diasporas of PK dispersed across magazines, anthologies, broadsides, chapbooks, and books sold off by generations of her local readers. Once I’d left the island for the mainland, my mother started her own acts of collecting bits of PK for me from local newspapers, saving the clippings and leaving them on my dresser to discover on my next visit home, or, even better, tucking them into an envelope and mailing them to me at various addresses in Calgary, Montreal, Ottawa, and Halifax—wherever the itinerant life of a young academic led me away from home. My mother archived my absence, speaking to me through ‘another Mother’—not through sentimental personal letters but through an affect-archive of cheap newsprint.

The only time my mother met PK was at the launch of Archive for Our Times, a collection of Dorothy Livesay’s fugitive poems that I edited and published in 1998. PK contributed an introductory poem to the volume, which she read at the launch, much to my mother’s delight. Since my mother worked for decades as a typist, she immediately embraced PK once I mentioned that she worked in war offices in Montreal in the 1940s. Mom had never been to a poetry reading before, and she followed along with the poems open on her lap as poets read selections of Livesay from the collection. In the car on the way home Mom turned to me and said that she found it much easier to understand why the poems were written the way they were when she followed along on the page as the poems were read aloud. She could tell from my face that I wasn’t quite understanding what she meant, so she explained: ‘It never made sense to me why poetry doesn’t go all the way to the edge of the page, but when I hear the poets read aloud, I could hear when they paused and see why the lines break where they do. That’s what poetry is, isn’t it? Learning to pause in the right places.’

My mother passed away on May Day two years ago. By the time I flew to Victoria from Halifax, she was already gone. As I flew across the continent, her major organs shut down one by one. Bereft, I drove to a strange address and wandered around my parents’ new house, an uncanny architectural version of my mother. I found myself unable to write her obituary. Who else was going to write it? There were no journalists to call her friends for an interview, no poets to type her elegies. I opened the paper to read the obituaries, hoping for a template, if not inspiration. I turned the pages looking for something, finding nothing. I put down the paper and went into the guest room: the room wasn’t mine, but the clipping on top of the dresser was waiting for me to find her last words.

Knowledge Cartography

January 17, 2010 Leave a comment

Knowledge Cartography: mapping social structures of knowledge http://ow.ly/XrOM

Categories: modernism